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Science Communication
Public Communication of Science and Technology

PCST-7

Papers and presentations

Note: Where papers and presentations were not available, the relevant abstract has been placed.

5 December 2002, Thursday

Plenary Session 1 Opening session
Chair: Rob Adam, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
  • Welcome by Conference Chair, Marina Joubert
  • Opening address by Dr Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Culture, Science and Technology, South Africa [Speech]
  • Science communication in a diverse world: Professor David King, Chief Scientific Adviser to HM Government and the Head of the Office of Science and Technology, United Kingdom
  • Public understanding of science - pick your favorite flavor: Dr Alan Leshner, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Parallel Session 1 Theme: Using technology to communicate science (A)
Chair: Hyman Field, National Science Foundation, USA
  • The Why Files as a laboratory for studying the role of the World Wide Web in public understanding of science: Sharon Dunwoody, University of Wisconsin-Madison and William Eveland, Ohio State University, USA [Abstract]
  • A web database of the European science museums, with path configurator and path search tool: Marco Bianucci, Roberto Fieschi and Silvia Merlino, INFM - University of Parma, Italy [Abstract]
  • Science Centers facing virtual dimension: Pierre-Marie Fayard and Tania Arboleda, UniversitÚ de Poitiers, France [Abstract]
  • Mass participation experiments: reaching new audiences through internet based experiments: Jill Nelson, British Association (the BA), UK [Abstract] [Presentation]
  • The Internet as a tool - Science in Africa showcasing African science: Janice Limson, Science in Africa, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 2 Theme: Trends in teaching and learning science communication
Chair: Winfried Goepfert, Free University of Berlin, Germany
  • Sharing expertise: The European Network of Science Communication Teachers (ENSCOT): Jeff Thomas, Centre for Science Education, The Open University, UK [Abstract]
  • Teaching science and technical communication online: Kenneth Friedman, Lehigh University, USA [Presentation]
  • The Stanford Research Communication Program: Carolyn Gale, Stanford University, USA [Presentation]
Parallel Session 3 Theme: Science on the road - mobile outreach programmes
Chair: Fiona Barbagallo, British Association (the BA), UK
  • Taking science to the community - The Shell Questacon Science Circus: Sharyn Errington, The Australian National University, Australia [Paper]
  • An Aquarium Mobile Unit - A case study of communicating natural science: Russell Stevens, Two Oceans Aquarium, South Africa [Presentation]
  • Mobile screening clinic uses innovative health promotion to help minorities: Richard Atkins, Skip Lockwood and Jamie Bearse, National Prostate Cancer Coalition, USA [Paper]
  • Science on the highway - Taking science to the people: Makhwênkwe George Mvalo, Cape Technikon, South Africa [Paper]
  • Communicating "SET" to deep rural: Pack a punch by going mobile interactive: Johan van der Merwe, Discovery Centre, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 4 Theme: Science communication and narrative
Chair: Massimiano Bucchi, University of Trento, Italy
  • Science via narratives: communicating science through literary forms: Aquiles Negrete-Yankelevich, University of Bath, UK [Paper] [Presentation]
  • The naturalists and the popularisation of science: Ildeu de Castro Moreira, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and Luisa Massarani, Museum of Life, Brazil [Paper] [Presentation]
  • 'How is Your Stomach?' - Sharing stories as a form of science communication: Will Rifkin, Alan Morris, Briony Pavel, Jessica Bell, Vi Nguyen, Dominic Leung, Sei Nishimura, Linda Ong and Ho Thi Hien, University of New South Wales, Australia [Paper]
  • Learning how to tell the story: a workshop presentation: Peter Thomsen and Michael Duffy, Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal and Tropical Health, Australia [Presentation]
Parallel Session 5 Theme: Environmental communication (A)
Chair: Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, Australia
  • A study of communication plans for natural resource management: Anne Leitch, CSIRO and James Everett, Queensland University of Technology, Australia [Presentation]
  • Testing public (un)certainty of science - Media representations of global warming: Julia Corbett, Jessica Durfee, Roger Gunn, Maja Krakowjak and Jeffrey Nellermoe, University of Utah, USA [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Reaching out - marine science and resource management training for rural coastal communities: Judy Mann-Lang, Sea World Education Centre, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 6 Theme: Public perceptions and knowledge of science
Chair: Cheng Donghong, Chinese Academy of Science and Technology, China
  • Questions the public asks of science: Suzanne de Cheveigne, CNRS, France [Abstract]
  • Science and society in Europe: Michel Claessens, European Commission, Brussels [Presentation]
  • Public understanding of science and technology in Japan: Masamichi Ishii, National Institute of Science and Technology Policy, Japan [Paper]
  • Current scientific literacy of Chinese citizens - Findings from 2001 National Survey: Li Daguang, China Research Institute for Science Popularization, China [Abstract]
Parallel Session 7 Theme: Using technology to communicate science (B)
Chair: Lisbeth Fog, Colombian Association of Science Journalism, Colombia
  • Communicating science in cyberspace: Margaret Corbit, Cornell University, USA [Presentation]
  • Webcasting for scientific communication: Silvano de Gennaro and Paola Catapano, CERN, Switzerland [Presentation]
  • Reading and understanding a science report through paper and hypertext - an experimental study: Mônica Macedo-Rouet, Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil, Jean-François Rouet, CNRS and University of Poitiers, Pierre-Marie Fayard, University of Poitiers, France and Isaac Epstein, Methodist University of São Paulo, Brazil [Paper]
Parallel Session 8 Theme: Dialogue in science communication (A)
Chair: Hilda van Rooyen, National Research Foundation, South Africa
  • Should we continue to pursue dialogue? Fiona Barbagallo, British Association (the BA), UK [Presentation]
  • The Wellcome Trust and public engagement with bioscience: Sarah Bronsdon, The Wellcome Trust, UK [Presentation]
  • Public communication of S & T - German and European Perspectives: Ekkehard Winter, Stifterverband, Germany and Euroscience Association [Paper] [Presentation]
Parallel Session 9 Theme: Reaching out to rural communities (A)
Chair: Hak Soo Kim, Sogang University, South Korea
  • Communicating science to rural communities requires boundary crossing: Hester Meyer, University of South Africa, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Project oriented learning as a communication tool of environmental sciences in the community of Soshanguve - a case study: Verena Meyer, Technikon Northern Gauteng, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Improving communication between farmers and scientists: Belinda Clarke, Norwich Research Park Science, UK [Abstract]
Parallel Session 10 Theme: Showtime at science centres
Chair: Shadrack Mahapa, University of the North, South Africa
  • Science - The magic of publicly communicating and inspiring students to study it: Robert Friedhoffer, The Graduate Center of the City University of New York, USA [Abstract]
  • Science "Magic" Shows - Communicating science in an unforgettable way: Derek Fish, Unizul Science Centre, South Africa [Abstract]
  • From Cardiff to Cape Town: Intercultural experiences with informal science learning: Wendy Sadler, Science Communication Consultant, UK [Presentation]
Parallel Session 11 Theme: Science-media interfaces - building capacity in science journalism
Chair: Toss Gascoigne, FASTS, Australia
  • Mass Media Fellowship Program - An innovative way to communicate science: Judy Kass, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA [Abstract]
  • Building capacity in science radio journalism in South Africa: Kelebogile Dilotsotlhe, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa [Abstract]
  • Television weathercasters as science communicators - An examination of the advantages of accessing these specialists and explaining why a gender gap persists: Kris Wilson, University of Texas, USA [Abstract]
  • Impact of media-science roundtables and training programs for researchers: Mary Woolley, Research!America, USA [Abstract]
Parallel Session 12 Theme: Simulated ELISA test - a model for communicating HIV/AIDS awareness
Chair: Karen Wallace, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Practical workshop presented by Karen Wallace and Bette Davidowitz, Chemistry Department, University of Cape Town, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 13 Theme: Dialogue in science communication (B)
Chair: Dexter Mahlangu, National Research Foundation, South Africa
  • Making technological democracy work - Deliberative models of public consultation: Edna Einsiedel, University of Calgary, Canada [Abstract]
  • From science centre visitors to responsible citizens: Walter Staveloz, ECSITE, Belgium [Presentation]
Parallel Session 14 Theme: Communicating astronomy
Chair: Derek Fish, Unizul Science Centre, South Africa
  • A survivor's guide to the public understanding of science: Sandra Preston, McDonald Observatory, USA [Presentation]
  • Planetariums - beyond the naked eye: Tony Fairall, University of Cape Town and Planetarium at the SA Museum, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Doing it without electrons - Innovative resources for promoting astronomy: Case Rijsdijk, South African Astronomical Observatory, South Africa [Abstract]
Parallel Session 15 Theme: Reaching out to rural communities (B)
Chair: Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University, USA
  • Science and technology communication oriented towards China's rural population: Cheng Donghong, Lou Wei and Wang Huimei, China Association for Science and Technology, China [Abstract]
  • Communicating with rural communities to improve quality of life: Cheryl McCrindle, University of Pretoria, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Story of the larger grain borer: Communicating science to rural communities: Christelle Swart, Technikon Southern Africa and Marianna Theyse, Department of Agriculture, South Africa [Presentation] [Presentation]
Parallel Session 16 Theme: Celebrating science
Chair: Ndashinga Chasakara, Foundation for Education, Science and Technology, South Africa
  • UK Science Year - working to a pre-defined government brief: Jill Nelson, British Association (the BA), UK [Abstract] [Presentation]
  • New communication concepts for the UK during Science Year: Bobby Cerini, Science Year, UK [Abstract]
  • Promoting a culture of science in a festive way: Brian Wilmot, SASOL SciFEST, South Africa [Abstract]
  • Voices of teachers and learners about SASOL SciFEST - from "spectators" to players in science communication: Kenneth Ngcoza and Matole Reuben Maselwa, Rhodes University, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 17 Theme: Communicating with decision makers
Chair: Farouk Cassim, MP, South Africa
  • Talking to Members of Parliament about the importance of science: Toss Gascoigne, Federation of Australian Scientific and Technological Societies, Australia [Abstract]
  • Science needs good public relations: A marketing approach to science-industry relations: Andrzej Jasinski, University of Warsaw, Poland [Paper]
  • Communication, creativity and commercialisation of science in Australian research institutions: Beryl Morris, Vaccine Solutions Pty Ltd, Australia [Presentation]
  • Is there a mandate for science? Examining science policy debates during a UK general election: Elizabeth Vidler, Richard Holliman, Jeff Thomas, The Open University, United Kingdom [Paper]
Parallel Session 18 Theme: Perspectives on communicating HIV/AIDS
Chair: Michelle Galloway, Medical Research Council, South Africa
  • Public communication's impact on the history of science and societies - The 20 years media coverage of AIDS in a cross-cultural study: Gemma Revuelta, N˙ria PÚrez, Elisa Almeida Franša, Maria Roura and Vladimir de Semir, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain [Presentation]
  • Agenda setting politics - An analysis of main stream newspaper reports on HIV/Aids: Gideon de Wet, Potchefstroom University, South Africa [Abstract]
  • Tswana speaking students' awareness of HIV/Aids and poverty: Paul Schutte, Potchefstroom University, South Africa [Presentation]
  • A critical analysis of reproductive health information in South Africa: Nolwazi Mbananga, Medical Research Council, South Africa [Paper]
17:30 - 18:00 Poster presentation sessions in Lecture Theatres 1, 2 & 3
Boring science radio and other educational dilemmas
  1. Boring science - the challenge for educational radio: Robert Firmhofer, Polskie Radio, Poland [Abstract]
  2. INFM partner in an exciting European education project: Silvia Merlino, Roberto Fieschi, Marco Bianucci and Brian Davies, University of Parma, Italy [Abstract]
  3. Mad about maths and science - Stepping the way for the future: Nonceba Shoba and Joyce Sewry, Albany Museum and Rhodes University, South Africa [Abstract]
  4. Marketing the essence - A passionate strategy to address the MST [Mathematics, Science and Technology] crisis: Sue Southwood, Rhodes University, South Africa
  5. Teaching science and technology using African and European illustrations drawn from everyday life: Kevin Rochford, University of Cape Town, South Africa [Paper]
Doing it differently: New research and methods for science communication
  1. Biographies of scientists to promote public interest in science and technology: Shigeo Sugiyama, Hokkaido University, Japan [Abstract]
  2. Development in science communication - The need for crossing borders of sciences: Maarten van der Sanden, Delft University of Technology and Frans Meijman, VU-University Medical Center, The Netherlands [Abstract]
  3. Pondering a process approach to writing - An action research project: Jennifer Wright and A Solomon, Peninsula Technikon, South Africa [Abstract]
  4. Science awareness and knowledge of first-year students at the University of the North - A ten-year perspective: Rolf Becker, Kirsten Lucas, University of the North and Rudi Laugksch, Department of Education, South Africa [Abstract]
  5. Communicating science through art in the workplace: Shirley Koller, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), USA
  6. Perceptions of science in rural and urban communities: Using marketing tools as an aid for differentiation: Sarah Pearson and David Pearson, University of New England, Australia [Abstract]
From volcanic eruptions to the missionary complex - the seductive power of the media
  1. Echoes of the Nyiragongo volcanic eruption in the European media: Tiziana Lanza, Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Italy [Abstract]
  2. The missionary complex - American perspective of China over a hundred years - A critical analysis of National Geographic Magazine between 1888-1998: Xiao Xinxin and Li Xiguang, Tsinghua University, China [Abstract]
  3. Analysis of science and technology reporting in the South African media: Carine van Rooyen, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa [Abstract]

6 December 2002, Friday

Plenary Session 2 Theme: Science and art
Chair: Adi Paterson, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
08:30 - 09:15 Dan Dare at the Cosmos Ballroom - Contemporary art takes on science: Siân Ede, Gulbenkian Foundation, UK
09:15 - 09:45 New ways of taking science to people: Frank Burnet and Ben Johnson, University of West England, UK
09:45 - 10:15 Communicating science through visual art: Eric Heller, Harvard University, USA
10:15 - 10:45 Communicating with the public through symposia and other events on science and the arts: Brian Schwartz, The Graduate Centre of the City University of New York, USA
Parallel Session 19 Theme: Networking and collaboration
Chair: Paola Catapano, CERN, Switzerland
  • EUSCEA: A quantum leap for European science communication: Mikkel Bohm, Danish Science Communication, Denmark [Presentation]
  • Collaboration creates the difference: Peter Burke, Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, New Zealand [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Physics without borders - A global model for physics communication: Judith Jackson, Fermilab, USA [Presentation]
  • Promoting science awareness in the Pacific - The creation of the Pacific Science Communication Network: Roderick Lamberts, The Australian National University, Australia [Paper] [Presentation]
Parallel Session 20 Theme: Science communication and health
Chair: Charleen Daries, Medical Research Council, South Africa
  • 'In Cipro we trust" - Bacillus anthracis in the United States: Andrew Pleasant, Cornell University, USA [Abstract]
  • Communicating about radiation: Problems with complex science, distrust and journalistic constraints: Sharon Friedman, Lehigh University, USA [Abstract]
  • Risk estimation in rural social networks - The BSE case: opinion making in a community in northern Germany: Markus Lehmkuhl, Free University of Berlin, Germany [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Social engagement with health research - An outcome based assessment approach: Shyama Kuruvilla, World Health Organisation, Switzerland, Andrew Pleasant and Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University, USA [Abstract]
Parallel Session 21 Theme: Environmental communication (B)
Chair: Mike Bruton, MTN ScienCentres, South Africa
  • Communicating the Coelacanth Initiative: Margot Collett, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB), South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Hot at the South Pole? Discover the adventure of polar and marine research: Margarete Pauls, Alfred-Wegener-Institut fŘr Polar- und Meeresforschung, Germany [Paper]
  • The evolution of state of rivers reporting in South Africa: Wilma Strydom, Ernita van Wyk, Gillian Maree and Tinyiko Maluleke, CSIR, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Science @ Environment Canada: Paul Hempel, Environment Canada [Presentation]
Parallel Session 22 Theme: Inspiring the young - science communication for the future of science
Chair: Wendy Sadler, Science Communication Consultant, UK
  • Science communication at the CSIRO: Chris Krishna-Pillay, CSIRO Education, Australia [Presentation]
  • Science communication, public understanding versus professional careers: Hendrik Snijders, Stichting Weten, The Netherlands Foundation for Public Communication on Science and Technology [Abstract]
  • Brighter future in mind for science education in Australia: Tony Sadler, Bright Minds Project, The University of Queensland, Australia [Paper]
  • Physics on the Move - Taking hands-on science to South African high schools: Jeremy Dodd, Columbia University, USA [Presentation]
Parallel Session 23 Theme: Conceptual developments in science communication (A)
Chair: Vladimir de Semir, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain
  • Knowledge management challenges for PCST in the knowledge-based society: Pierre-Marie Fayard, University of Poitiers, France [Abstract]
  • Engagement - A new conceptual key of PCST: Hak-Soo Kim, Sogang University, Korea [Abstract]
  • Two cultures - an uneasy alliance between education and communication: Jeff Thomas, Centre for Science Education, The Open University, UK [Presentation]
Parallel Session 24 Theme: Communicating biotechnology and biomedical sciences (A)
Chair: Helen Malherbe, Foundation for Education, Science and Technology, South Africa
  • Development of best practice communication strategies for public awareness on biotechnology issues: Sarah Brooker, Biotechnology Australia, Australia [Presentation]
  • Experiences in communicating biotechnology: Mary Vail, Science Education Partnership, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Thomas DeVries, Vashon Island High School, Esther Levy, BiotecnologÝa Para Todos, Rachel von Roeschlaub, DNA Adventures, Inc., USA [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Does information matter? Media exposure, information and attitudes to biotechnology in the Italian public: Massimiano Bucchi, UniversitÓ di Trento and Federico Neresini, UniversitÓ di Padova, Italy [Presentation]
  • Transgenic futures - Narratives of the medicine cow: Esa Vńliverronen, University of Helsinki, Finland [Abstract]
Parallel Session 25 Theme: Communicating biotechnology and biomedical sciences (B)
Chair: Jennifer Thomson, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Evaluation of presentations to the general public with a biomedical focus: Khalipha Ramahlape and Valerie Corfield, Medical Research Council, and Francois Cilliers, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa [Presentation]
  • Reporting contested science - Comparing media coverage of genetic explanations for sexuality and intelligence: Richard Holliman, Eileen Scanlon and Elizabeth Vidler, Open University, United Kingdom [Paper]
  • PubliForum - A bridge between science and society: Sergio Bellucci, Swiss Science and Technology Council, Switzerland [Presentation]
Parallel Session 26 Theme: Links to education
Chair: Simon John, Consultant - North West Province, South Africa
  • Strategies for effective communication of environmental science to rural communities: John Odiyo and PH Omara-Ojungu, University of Venda, South Africa [Presentation]
  • International perspective of environmental education - Applied research in the Philippines and Japan: Merle Tan, The University of the Philippines and Hiroki Fujii, Hiroshima Women's University, Japan [Abstract]
  • Communicating science in the rural areas: Matsontso Mathebula, World Books, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 27 Theme: Conceptual developments in science communication (B)
Chair: Pierre-Marie Fayard, University of Poitiers, France
  • What are we communicating to the SA public? Maritha Snyman, University of Pretoria, South Africa [Presentation]
  • From the 'two cultures' towards the '(multi)cultural' paradigm in science communication: JosÚ van Dijck, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Science centres in the Dutch stakeholder society: Ben Kokkeler and Theo Kemperman, Dutch Science Centres Assocation, Netherlands
Parallel Session 28 Theme: Scientific uncertainty and science communication
Chair: Sharon Friedman, Lehigh University, USA
  • Panel discussion led by Sharon Friedman, Lehigh University, with Sharon Dunwoody, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Julia Corbett, University of Utah, USA and Edna Einsiedel, University of Calgary, Canada [Abstract]
Parallel Session 29 Theme: The changing face of science museums and centres (A)
Chair: Anusuya Chinsamay-Turan, Iziko Museums of Cape Town, South Africa
  • Integrated and customized science communication - Reaching diverse audiences through diverse projects: Erik Jacquemyn, Technopolis, Belgium [Presentation]
  • Sustainable development bridges the gap between zoos and science centres: Walter Staveloz, ECSITE, Belgium [Presentation]
  • The Multi-Platform approach - The vision, the science, the outreach and the presentation: Terry Hutter, Exploration Place, USA [Abstract]
Parallel Session 30 Workshop
Chair: Suzanne King, People Science and Policy Ltd., UK
  • Social sciences and science communication: Suzanne King, People Science and Policy Ltd., UK
    Increasingly scientists need to listen to the public as well as talk to them. This workshop is an opportunity to share your experiences and ideas and to learn from others at the conference. [Presentation]
Parallel Session 31 Theme: Visualising science communication
Chair: Bernard Schiele, University of Quebec, Canada
  • Design and science: Birgit Mager, University of Applied Sciences in Cologne, Germany [Abstract]
  • Exploring linkages between science and art to communicate science: Bobby Cerini, Science Year, UK [Abstract]
  • Representing climate change futures - Developing the use of images for visual communication: Sophie Nicholson-Cole, The University of East Anglia, UK [Paper] [Presentation]
  • IKS amongst artisans in India and South Africa: Hester du Plessis and Gauha Raza, Technikon Witwatersrand, South Africa [Paper] [Presentation]
Parallel Session 32 Theme: Science and media research
Chair: George Claassen, Stellenbosch University, South Africa
  • Science in the news - A cross-cultural study of newspapers in five European countries: Richard Holliman, The Open University, UK [Paper]
  • Scientific controversy in the New Zealand mass media: Laura Sessions, University of Canterbury, New Zealand [Presentation]
  • The "public meaning" of science: Thoughts of TV viewers during science programs: Hans Peter Peters, Research Center Juelich, Germany [Presentation]
Parallel Session 33 Workshop
Chair: Terry Hutter, Exploration Place, USA
  • Hands-on workshop of creative, inexpensive ideas for museums and Q&A by Nell Heyen, Museum of Ancient Treasures, Shannon Maloney-Scholler, Diana Hutter and Terry Hutter, Exploration Place, USA [Abstract]
Parallel Session 34 Theme: The changing face of science museums and centres (B)
Chair: Walter Staveloz, ECSITE, Belgium
  • Museums and science communication: Orest Jarh, Technical Museum of Slovenia [Presentation]
  • Science communication at the cutting edge: Is a museum the best way to showcase research to diverse audiences? Christine Cansfield-Smith, CSIRO, Australia [Presentation]
  • Science, museums and the public: Anusuya Chinsamy-Turan, Iziko Museums of Cape Town, South Africa [Presentation]
Parallel Session 35 Theme: Cultural diversity and context in science communication
Chair: Kelebogile Dilosotlhe, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa
  • Public understanding of ethical, legal and social issues related to genomic research: Assessing communication models in intercultural contexts: Dominique Brossard, Bruce Lewenstein and Joanna Radin, Cornell University, USA [Presentation]
  • "The DNA Detective" makes molecular biology maximally meaningful and "Food-4-Thought" caters to all: Valerie Corfield, Medical Research Council, Masha Ainslie, Western Cape Primary Science Programme, and Francois Cilliers, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa [Presentation]
  • Effective communication of science in a culturally diverse society: Sibusiso Manzini, Department of Science and Technology, South Africa [Paper]
  • Science communication in the bilateral cooperation: Denis Phakisi, Ministry of Local Government, Lesotho; BL Morolong, Institute of Extra Mural Studies, National University of Lesotho and Molisana Molisana, Maloti Development Trust, Lesotho [Abstract]
Parallel Session 36 Theme: Focus on scientists
Chair: Janice Limson, Science in Africa, South Africa
  • Emerging scenario of science and technology journalism in India: Manoj Patairiya, National Council for Science and Technology Communication, India [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Views of distance education science students on the social responsibility of scientists: DŘrten R÷hm, Nthabiseng Ogude and Marissa Rollnick, University of South Africa [Abstract]
  • Are science students interested in science? Rolf Becker and Kirsten Lucas, University of the North, and Rudi Laugksch, University of Cape Town, South Africa [Abstract]
  • MRC scientists and the media - Attitudes to and experiences of reporting their findings to the public: Leverne Gething, Medical Research Council, South Africa [Abstract]
17:30 - 18:00 Poster presentations in Lecture Theatre 1, 2 and 3
Science e-communication - media services, infant health care, e-science mags and more
  1. Computer literacy in the world of business: Susanne Taylor and Johan Vorster, Technikon Witwatersrand, South Africa [Abstract]
  2. The INFM's initiatives for the educational field and for the public awareness through multimedia instruments: Paolo Bussei, Roberto Fieschi, Marco Bianucci, Silvia Merlino, INFM- University of Parma, Italy [Abstract]
  3. MicroWorlds - Electronic science magazine: Elizabeth Moxon and Arthur Robinson, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA [Abstract]
  4. The HSRC's Human Resources Development Data Warehouse project - Disseminating research information for government and for the public domain: Robin Naude, Arjen van Zwieten and Andrew Paterson, Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa [Abstract]
  5. Traditional and online media - how the Internet has changed the reporting of medical news: Keiko Kandachi, University of Maryland and Newsweek Japan, USA [Paper]
  6. How to create a web based national media service: Tina Zethraeus, Swedish Research Council, Sweden
Learning or communication - that is the question!
  1. Communication within the health sciences - An integrated approach for students: Bridget Wyrley-Birch, Peninsula Technikon/Groote Schuur Hospital, South Africa [Abstract]
  2. Development of an environmental physics undergraduate major course: Dirk Knoesen, University of the Western Cape, South Africa [Abstract]
  3. Mechanical technology for the classroom and for PUSET exhibitions: Jeff Bindon, Natal University, South Africa (display) [Abstract]
  4. Project Oriented Learning as teaching methodology in the teaching of science and technology: Charlotta Coetzee, Technikon Northern Gauteng, South Africa [Abstract]
  5. Project Oriented Learning in the Faculty of Engineering at TNG - An example: Charlotta Coetzee, Technikon Northern Gauteng, South Africa [Abstract]
  6. Project Oriented Learning (POL) as a tool for communicating environmental chemistry in the department of chemistry, TNG: Corrie van der Linde and Verena Meyer, Technikon Nothern Gauteng, South Africa [Abstract]
  7. The joy of learning - Skills vs. Challenges: Johan Benade and Mike Colley, The Big Picture, Brent Hutcheson and Philip Haas, Hands on Technologies, South Africa [Abstract]
Exploring cultural diversity
  1. A comparison of 340 participants' performances on a compact programme of 17 science practical tasks according to their English language proficiency and geographical areas: Aydin Inal, University of Cape Town, South Africa [Abstract]
  2. An evaluation of the drawings in a new South African textbook for science and technology: A large scale comparison of the assessment responses of different cultural groups: Keith Jacobs, University of Cape Town [Abstract]
  3. Experiences of widowhood and beliefs about the mourning process of the Batswana people: Minrie Greeff, E Manyedi, MP Koen, Potchefstroom University, South Africa [Abstract]
  4. Infusing science and technology from the ground up - A systematic approach applied in Lesotho: Dennis Phakisi, TechnoLed, Lesotho [Paper]
  5. The patient relationship and therapeutic techniques of the South Sotho traditional healer: Minrie Greeff, E Manyedi, MP Koen, Potchefstroom University, South Africa [Abstract]

7 December 2002, Saturday

Plenary Session 3 Theme: Different cultures and new challenges
Chair: Anastassios Pouris, Foundation for Education, Science and Technology, South Africa
09:00 - 09:30 Science communication perspectives from the African-Caribbean Network: Elizabeth Rasekoala, African-Caribbean Network for Science & Technology, UK
09:30 - 10:00 Science communication to rural communities - An experience from Uganda: Alex Tindimubona, Network of Ugandan Researchers and Research Users, Uganda [Presentation]
10:00 - 10:30 Rethinking the role of the information officer in S&T communication: Rick Borchelt, Whitehead Institute, MIT, USA [Presentation]
Parallel Session 37 Theme: Indigenous science communication
Chairs: Peter Thomsen and Michael Duffy, Cooperative Research Centre for Aboriginal and Tropical Health, Australia
  • Sharing indigenous knowledge at Questacon: Neil Hermes, Questacon, Australia [Abstract]
  • Planting the seeds of science and technology within a Maori community: Mark Laws, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand [Paper] [Presentation]
  • The Ashkui Project - Using cultural landscapes to link Labrador Innu knowledge and Western science: Geoff Howell, David Wilson, Environment Canada and Jack Selma, Innu Nation, Canada [Paper]
  • PCST and Local Wisdom (LW) - Could ICT bridge PCST and LW for the knowledge-based society? Yuwanuch Tinnaluck, NSTDA, Thailand [Presentation]
  • Science public - Spreading the case of Elhuyar: Leire Canico Orueta, Elhuyar, Spain [Presentation]
Parallel Session 38 Theme: Communicating science through theatre & dance
Chair: Chris Krishna-Pillay, CSIRO, Australia
  • Human cloning - A soap opera as a science communication tool: Luisa Massarani, Museum of Life, and ldeu de Castro Moreira, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Using drama to communicate science: Gillian Pearson and Bridget Holligan, The Oxford Trust, UK [Paper] [Presentation]
  • Communicating ideas of science through the language of Classical Indian Dance: Tonie Stolberg, University of Birmingham, UK [Presentation]
Parallel Session 39 Theme: Evaluating science communication programs
Chair: Suzanne de Cheveigne, CNRS, France
  • Inside the big black box - Evaluating the impact of the public visits programs in five major research laboratories in Europe: Paola Catapano, CERN, Switzerland and Giuseppe Pellegrini, Italy [Presentation]
  • The challenges of evaluating public understanding of science events in South Africa - Paving the way for ensuring meaningful evaluations: Colleen Hughes, Foundation for Education, Science and Technology, South Africa [Presentation]
  • Evaluating European public awareness of science initiatives - A review of the literature: Chris Edwards, The Open University, UK [Paper]
Parallel Session 40 Workshop
Chairs: Toss Gascoigne, FASTS, Australia and Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, Australia
  • Training scientists to use the media effectively: Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, Australia and Toss Gascoigne, Federation of Australian Scientific and Technological Societies (FASTS), Australia [Abstract]
Parallel Session 41 Theme: 25 Ways to spot an expert - how people decide who is worth listening to
Chair: Will Rifkin, University of New South Wales, Australia
  • 25 Ways to Spot an Expert - How people decide who is worth listening to: Will Rifkin, University of New South Wales, Australia [Paper]
Parallel Session 42 Theme: Science education
Chair: Michael Kahn, University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • BMW Centers for excellence in mathematics, dcience and technology: Esther Langa, BMW, South Africa and Sadha Moodley, Boston University, USA [Abstract]
  • School innovation in science - The development, education and public communication of science in Victorian schools: Jane Harvey, Department of Education and Training (Victoria), Australia [Paper]
  • How did the Japanese science curriculum impact on the public knowledge of science and technology: An empirical analysis of a recent survey: Kinya Shimizu, Hiroshima University, Japan [Presentation]
  • Innovations in Australian science education: Paula Taylor, Department of Education and Training (Victoria), Australia [Paper]
  • On TRAC in science education: Wayne Duff-Riddell, Stellenbosch University, South Africa [Paper]
  • SA learners learn basic hands-on electronics as facilitated by an IT learning environment: Miranda Myburgh, Stellenbosch University, South Africa [Paper]
  • What are the key elements for ensuring an effective materials awareness programme? Jane Pritchard and Caroline Baillie, UK Centre for Materials Education, Liverpool, UK [Paper] [Presentation]
Chair: Marina Joubert, Foundation for Education, Science and Technology, South Africa
  • Preview of PCST-8 in Barcelona, Spain in 2004: Vladimir de Semir, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain
  • Announcement of host country for PCST-9 in 2006
Parallel Session 43 Discussion session
Chair: Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University, USA
  • Discussion session on public understanding of science and research in the developing world context led by Bruce Lewenstein, Cornell University, USA
Parallel Session 44 Workshop
Chair: Chris Krishna-Pillay, CSIRO Education, Australia
  • Theatre in science communication: Chris Krishna-Pillay, CSIRO Education, Australia [Presentation]
Parallel Session 45 Workshop
Chair: Rick Borchelt, Whitehead Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, and a representative from the University of Cape Town, South Africa
  • The development of science communication strategies in public institutions [Abstract]
Parallel Session 46 Workshop
Chair: Lily Whiteman, Consultant, USA
  • Signs of intelligible life in the scientific community - the sciences begin to embrace plain language: Lily Whiteman, USA (hands-on workshop and tips on communicating science in plain language) [Presentation]
Parallel Session 47 Theme: Communicating science in the savannas
Chair: Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, Australia
  • The use of weather stations in science communication in the US savannas: Terry Hutter, Exploration Place, USA [Abstract]
  • Matching western science with indigenous knowledge systems: Caroline Selepe, Technikon Northern Gauteng, South Africa [Presentation]
  • Communicating science to diverse audiences in Australia's northern savannas - with examples of effective communication tools: Kate O'Donnell, CRC for Tropical Savanna Management, Australia [Presentation]

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