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May 2017



Opinion poll


On Tuesday, 9 May 2017, scientists announced in Johannesburg that the Rising Star Cave system has revealed yet more important discoveries, only a year and a half after it was announced that the richest fossil hominin site in Africa had been discovered, and that it contained a new hominin species named Homo naledi.

The original Homo naledi remains from the Dinaledi Chamber has been revealed to be startlingly young in age. Homo naledi, which was first announced in September 2015, was alive sometime between 335 and 236 thousand years ago. This places this population of primitive, small brained hominins at a time and place that it is likely they lived alongside Homo sapiens. This is the first time that it has been demonstrated that another species of hominin survived alongside the first humans in Africa.

Do you think scientists have dated Homo naledi correctly?


Yes, I think the scientists got it correct.

No, I think the scientists have got it wrong.

I don't know if it is correct or not.